books0977
books0977:

The Parade: An Illustrated Gift Book for Boys and Girls. Gleeson White, ed. London: H. Henry & Co., 1897.
"Now in the Land of Two Moons, which was the next country to theirs, there lived a beautiful Princess. She was called the Princess Verbena. She was four inches high, and she had golden hair, and cheeks like pink geraniums, and eyes like field forget-me-nots. The whole world said that she was quite faultless…" 

books0977:

The Parade: An Illustrated Gift Book for Boys and Girls. Gleeson White, ed. London: H. Henry & Co., 1897.

"Now in the Land of Two Moons, which was the next country to theirs, there lived a beautiful Princess. She was called the Princess Verbena. She was four inches high, and she had golden hair, and cheeks like pink geraniums, and eyes like field forget-me-nots. The whole world said that she was quite faultless…" 

books0977
books0977:

Reading Woman in the Villa Garden (wife of the artist, Léni) (1912). Róbert Berény (Hungarian, 1887-1953). Pastel on cardboard.
Berény is best known for his form of expressionism and cubism, which he developed in association with the avant-garde group known as The Eight, who had their first exhibit together in Budapest in 1909. He brought to them French influences from his time in Paris.

books0977:

Reading Woman in the Villa Garden (wife of the artist, Léni) (1912). Róbert Berény (Hungarian, 1887-1953). Pastel on cardboard.

Berény is best known for his form of expressionism and cubism, which he developed in association with the avant-garde group known as The Eight, who had their first exhibit together in Budapest in 1909. He brought to them French influences from his time in Paris.

ajackdawintheattic

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)